1956 Hugo Nominee List Rediscovered

Sep. 24th, 2017 01:33 am
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Posted by Wobbuffet

"When the Received Wisdom is Wrong" by Mike Glyer: "This month fanhistorians were turned on their ears when a previously unknown shortlist of 1956 Hugo nominees came to light ... As the official Hugo Award site explained when they updated the entry for 1956 – 'We thank Olav Rokne for bringing to our attention an article on page 15 of the 1956 Worldcon Progress Report 3 ...'" Several previously unacknowledged fiction nominees are available online.

Best Novel
  • Double Star by Robert A. Heinlein
  • Call Him Dead by Eric Frank Russell
  • The End of Eternity by Isaac Asimov
  • Not this August by Cyril Kornbluth
  • The Long Tomorrow by Leigh Brackett
Best Novelette
  • "Exploration Team" by Murray Leinster
  • "A Gun for Dinosaur" by L. Sprague de Camp
  • "Brightside Crossing" by Alan Nourse
  • "Home There's No Returning" by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore
  • "Legwork" by Eric Frank Russell
  • "The Assistant Self" by F.L. Wallace
  • "The End of Summer" by Algis Budrys
  • "Who?" by Theodore Sturgeon
Best Short Story

Systemd unit files

Sep. 23rd, 2017 10:00 pm
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Posted by Enrico Zini

These are the notes of a training course on systemd I gave as part of my work with Truelite.

Writing .unit files

For reference, the global index with all .unit file directives is at man systemd.directives.

All unit files have a [Unit] section with documentation and dependencies. See man systemd.unit for documentation.

It is worth having a look at existing units to see what they are like. Use systemctl --all -t unittype for a list, and systemctl cat unitname to see its content wherever it is installed.

For example: systemctl cat graphical.target. Note that systemctl cat adds a line of comment at the top so one can see where the unit file is installed.

Most unit files also have an [Install] section (also documented in man systemd.unit) that controls what happens when enabling or disabling the unit.

See also:

.target units

.target units only contain [Unit] and [Install] sections, and can be used to give a name to a given set of dependencies.

For example, one could create a remote-maintenance.target unit, that when brought up activates, via dependencies, a set of services, mounts, network sockets, and so on.

See man systemd.target

See systemctl --all -t target for examples.

special units

man systemd.special has a list of units names that have a standard use associated to them.

For example, ctrl-alt-del.target is a unit that is started whenever Control+Alt+Del is pressed on the console. By default it is symlinked to reboot.target, and you can provide your own version in /etc/systemd/system/ to perform another action when Control+Alt+Del is pressed.

User units

systemd can also be used to manage services on a user session, starting them at login and stopping them at logout.

Add --user to the normal systemd commands to have them work with the current user's session instead of the general system.

See systemd/User in the Arch Wiki for a good description of what it can do.

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Posted by digby

I don’t feel tardy: A back-to-school mixtape

By Dennis Hartley 
















Pfft. Wow. That was a quick friggin’ summer.

As great poets have said…autumn is over the long leaves that love us, yesterday is dead (but not in my memory), and it’s late September and I really should be back at school

Well, not literally (I’m a little old for home room)…but my school days of yesteryear are not necessarily dead in my memory. Some habits die hard. As I prefaced in a 2010 post:

It’s a funny thing. I know that this is supremely silly (I’m over 50, fergawdsake)-but as soon as September rolls around and retailers start touting their “back to school” sales, I still get that familiar twinge of dread. How do I best describe it? It’s a vague sensation of social anxiety, coupled with a melancholy resignation to the fact that from now until next June, I have to go to bed early. BTW, now that I’m allowed to stay up with the grownups, why do I drift off in my chair at 8pm every night? It’s another one of life’s cruel ironies.

So here’s a back-to-school playlist that doesn’t include “The Wall” or “School’s Out” (don’t worry, you’ll get over it). Pencils down, pass your papers forward, and listen up…

“Alma Mater” – Alice Cooper

“At 17” – Janis Ian


“Cinnamon Street” – Roxette



“ELO Kiddies” – Cheap Trick




“Me &Julio Down by the Schoolyard” – Paul Simon



“My Old School” – Steely Dan

=
“Rock ‘n’ Roll High School” – The Ramones





“School” – Roger Hodgson



“School Days” – Chuck Berry




“Smokin’ in the Boy’s Room” – Brownsville Station




“Status Back Baby” – Frank Zappa & the Mothers of Invention




“Teacher Teacher” – Rockpile




“Thirteen” – Big Star


“To Sir, With Love” – Lulu



“Wind-up” – Jethro Tull




Previous posts with related themes:







--Dennis Hartley

QOTD: Congressman Mike Quigley

Sep. 23rd, 2017 04:00 pm
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Posted by digby

QOTD: Congressman Mike Quigley

by digby


Democratic member of the House Intelligence Committee:


"I was old enough to understand — and watch — Watergate," he said. "This is so much more important. Because I believe that if you had seen what I have seen, you'd want me to go full throttle. Anything that makes the analysis of this by Congress, or any other investigators, inconsistent in any way ... reduces how important this is."


I guess the Republicans covering for Trump figure that even if Mueller proves that he was working on behalf of the Russian government he's worth protecting. Honestly, that surprises even me and I'm as cynical about Republicans as you can get.

Here's the whole talk if you want to hear it. It's quite interesting.





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Posted by digby

Reminder about Trump's eugenics beliefs

by digby






Just in case anyone's wondering why he can't stop dividing the country with racist rants like last night's gross comments in Alabama stoking his white supremacist base:



LA Times: For months the political press has been grappling with the greased-pig problem that is Donald Trump, trying to pin down the Republican front-runner as he defies establishment expectations and rejects basic standards of decorum. Much of the time I devoted to my Trump biography was consumed with the same activity: I spent countless hours fact-checking the torrent of slippery claims he made during our interviews. Even more difficult was divining the source of his sense of entitlement.

As campaign reporters are now coming to realize, Trump is not concerned with anyone's dignity, even his own, and will readily deploy lies and distortions when they serve as applause lines. None of the Trump claims checked by Politifact has turned out to be absolutely true by its standards, while 30 have been judged false or, worse, “pants on fire” statements. Yet Trump refuses to correct himself and, instead, ups the ante. Recently he tweeted race-baiting false statistics that appeared to have originated from a neo-Nazi source.

Like history's monarchs, Trump believes that the qualities that make him successful are in-born.

Some who try to understand why Trump would do such things might wonder if he's a deeply wounded, insecure soul compensating with narcissistic bluster. This diagnosis doesn't fit the Trump who answered my questions for many hours, nor does it match the conclusion reached by his second wife, Marla Maples. “He's a king,” said Maples when I interviewed her. “I mean truly. He is. He's a king. He really is a ruler of the world, as he sees it.”

Maples suspects that Trump was a royal figure in some past life. More likely he acquired his reverse noblesse oblige by training from his father who, according to Trump biographer Harry Hurt III, raised young Donald to become “a killer” and told him “you are king.” His mother was so enchanted by royalty that Trump keenly remembers the hours she spent watching the TV broadcast of Queen Elizabeth's coronation.

His sense of entitlement has been affirmed throughout his life. In 1987, at a party marking the publication of Trump's book “The Art of the Deal,” boxing promoter Don King turned to the crowd and proclaimed the arrival of Trump and his then-wife Ivana by saying, “Here's the king and the queen!” A few years later, when he appeared at an event at one of his Atlantic City casinos, an announcer bellowed, “Let's hear it for the king!” — and Trump burst through a large paper screen. When he visited the humble village of his Scottish ancestors he told his relatives that because of his TV show “The Apprentice,” he was American royalty. “If you get ratings, you're king, like me. I'm a king. If you don't get ratings, you're thrown off the air like a dog.”

Like history's monarchs, Trump believes that the qualities that make him successful are in-born. He once said he possesses a genetic “gift” for real estate development.

“I'm a big believer in natural ability,” Trump told me during a discussion about his leadership traits, which he said came from a natural sense of how human relations work. “If Obama had that psychology, Putin wouldn't be eating his lunch. He doesn't have that psychology and he never will because it's not in his DNA.” Later in this discussion, Trump said: “I believe in being prepared and all that stuff. But in many respects, the most important thing is an innate ability.”

Perhaps Trump's conviction that DNA — not life experience — is everything explains why he proudly claims that he's “basically the same” today as when he was a boy. “When I look at myself in the first grade and I look at myself now, I'm basically the same,” he said. “The temperament is not that different.”

Academic research popularized by Malcolm Gladwell in his 2002 essay “The Talent Myth” demonstrates that achievement depends more on dedication and experience than in-bred ability. But this message is lost on many well-to-do Americans who, researchers have found, believe their wealth affirms their innate superiority. The better-off are also more inclined to believe that “people get what they are entitled to have.”

Trump has handed down his sense of entitlement to the next generation. His son Donald Jr. told me: “Like him, I'm a big believer in race-horse theory. He's an incredibly accomplished guy, my mother's incredibly accomplished, she's an Olympian, so I'd like to believe genetically I'm predisposed to [be] better than average.”

The notion that Donald Jr.'s mother, Ivana Trump, was an Olympic skier in 1972 persists even though her country, Czechoslovakia, fielded no team. Her son not only believes the tall tale, he's convinced that it affirms his own superiority. “I'm in the high percentile on the bell curve,” he said. He then added that his father's abilities are even greater. “That's what separates him from everyone I know.”

The racehorse theory of human development explains Trump's belief in his suitability for political leadership, despite the fact that he has never held office. He's absolutely convinced that America's problems will be solved by his God-given management skills, bankruptcies notwithstanding. You are either born with superior qualities — the right DNA — or you are not. And people get what they deserve. In his case, that includes the White House.

Why anyone would think he's a white supremacist is beyond me.

.

Trump is keeping hope alive

Sep. 23rd, 2017 01:30 pm
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Posted by digby

Trump is keeping hope alive

by digby




Last night. Again:

“We have a Supreme Court justice, Judge [Neil M.] Gorsuch, who will save — how about a thing called your Second Amendment,” the president said. “Right? Okay, remember that? If Crooked Hillary got elected, you would not have a Second Amendment, believe me. You’d be handing in your rifles. You’d be saying: ‘Here, here they are.’ ”

The president then stepped away from the lectern to act out how his supporters would have handed over their rifles to Democrat Hillary Clinton, who never called for rounding up all of the rifles in the country. Trump smirked and shrugged as the crowd started to chant: “Lock her up! Lock her up! Lock her up!” A small group of young men sitting close to the stage, dressed in blazers and red campaign hats, kept the beat by pumping their fists into the air.

“You gotta speak to Jeff Sessions about that,” Trump said.

Chuck Grassley is on it too:

When Sen. Charles E. Grassley announced that the Judiciary Committee wouldn’t make time to consider a replacement attorney general this year, he seemed to establish himself as a firewall between President Trump and the Russia probes the president has long sought to dismantle.

But the Iowa Republican’s continuing efforts to focus attention on Hillary Clinton’s emails, her family’s foundation and allegations that Democrats colluded with foreign governments suggest something else: that Grassley is also playing the part of partisan Republican, protecting the president he is also investigating.

He considers Clinton's emails and the Russia probe as part of one investigation into the FBI failing to do its job. Isn't that convenient?

.


[syndicated profile] lambda_ultimate_feed
Non-determinism: a sublanguage rather than a monad

A puzzlingly named, exceedingly technical device introduced to structure the denotational semantics has by now achieved cult status. It has been married to effects -- more than once. It is compulsively looked for in all manner of things, including burritos. At least two ICFP papers brought it up without a rhyme or reason (or understanding), as the authors later admitted. I am talking about monads.

In truth, effects are not married to monads and approachable directly. The profound insight behind monads is the structuring, the separation of `pure' (context-independent) and effectful computations. The structuring can be done without explicating mathematical monads, and especially without resorting to vernacular monads such as State, etc. This article gives an example: a simple, effectful, domain-specific sublanguage embedded into an expressive `macro' metalanguage. Abstraction facilities of the metalanguage such higher-order functions and modules help keep the DSL to the bare minimum, often to the first order, easier to reason about and implement.

The key insight predates monads and goes all the way back to the origins of ML, as a scripting language for the Edinburgh LCF theorem prover. What has not been clear is how simple an effectful DSL may be while remaining useful. How convenient it is, especially compared to the monadic encodings. How viable it is to forsake the generality of first-class functions and monads and what benefits it may bring. We report on an experiment set out to explore these questions.

We pick a rather complex effect -- non-determinism -- and use it in OCaml, which at first blush seems unsuitable since it is call-by-value and has no monadic sugar. And yet, we can write non-deterministic programs just as naturally and elegantly as in Haskell or Curry.

The running tutorial example is computing all permutations of a given list of integers. The reader may want to try doing that in their favorite language or plain OCaml. Albeit a simple exercise, the code is often rather messy and not obviously correct. In the functional-logic language Curry, it is strikingly elegant: mere foldr insert []. It is the re-statement of the specification: a permutation is moving the elements of the source list one-by-one into some position in the initially empty list. The code immediately tells that the number of possible permutations of n elements is n!. From its very conception in the 1959 Rabin and Scott's paper, non-determinism was called for to write clear specifications -- and then to make them executable. That is what will shall do.

"Shall we play a game?"

Sep. 23rd, 2017 08:03 pm
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Posted by Fizz

The U.S. Navy's most advanced submarines will soon be using Xbox controllers [The Virginian Pilot] "The control room of one of the Navy's most advanced submarines is filled with sophisticated computers, flat-screen monitors and sailors who grew up in a digital world. At times it can look a bit like a video game arcade, and not just because of the high-resolution graphics. The Navy is beginning to use an Xbox 360 controller – like the ones you find at the mall – to operate the periscopes aboard Virginia-class submarines. [...]

"The Xbox controller is no different than the ones a lot of crew members grew up playing with. Lockheed Martin says the sailors who tested the controller at its lab were intuitively able to figure out how to use it on their own within minutes, compared to hours of training required for the joystick. The Xbox controller also is significantly cheaper. The company says the photonic mast handgrip and imaging control panel that cost about $38,000 can be replaced with an Xbox controller that typically costs less than $30."
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Posted by Bella Donna

Mr. Altizer is part of a backlash against the women in technology movement. While many in the tech industry had previously dismissed the fringe men's rights arguments, some investors, executives and engineers are now listening. Though studies and surveys show there is no denying the travails women face in the male-dominated industry, some said that the line for what counted as harassment had become too easy to cross and that the push for gender parity was too extreme a goal. Few were willing to talk openly about their thinking, for fear of standing out in largely progressive Silicon Valley.

Many men now feel like "there's a gun to the head" to be better about gender issues, said Rebecca Lynn, a venture capitalist at Canvas Ventures, and while "there's a high awareness right now, which is positive, at the same time there's a fear."

The backlash follows increasingly vulgar harassment revelations in Silicon Valley. Several female engineers and entrepreneurs this year named the men they accused of harassing them, and suddenly tech's boys' club seemed anything but impervious. Travis Kalanick, Uber's co-founder, resigned as chief executive after the ride-hailing service was embroiled in harassment accusations. Dave McClure, head of the incubator 500 Startups, called himself "a creep" and stepped down. This month, the chief executive of Social Finance, Mike Cagney, also quit amid a harassment scandal.

Maybe Somebody Should Do Something

Sep. 23rd, 2017 07:10 pm
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This isn't a sustainable state of affairs.

A humanitarian crisis grew Saturday in Puerto Rico as towns were left without fresh water, fuel, power or phone service following Hurricane Maria's devastating passage across the island.

A group of anxious mayors arrived in the capital to meet with Gov. Ricardo Rossello to present a long list of items they urgently need. The north coastal town of Manati had run out of fuel and fresh water, Mayor Jose Sanchez Gonzalez said.
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WEST LAFAYETTE, IN–Michigan holder Garrett Moores is fucking sick of giving little pep talks to his team’s kicker every time he misses a field goal, sources confirmed during Saturday’s game between Michigan and Purdue. “Jesus Christ, this shit is getting old,” Moores reportedly thought to himself after patting the kicker on the shoulder pads and offering words of support while the rest of the team jogged off the field following the missed field goal. “I told him he’d get it next time, but honestly that’s bullshit. He’s like a 50/50 shot out there and I can’t keep up this faking any longer.” At press time, Moores was reluctantly taking a seat next to the kicker, who was sitting completely alone on the bench.

RcppCNPy 0.2.7

Sep. 23rd, 2017 07:07 pm
[syndicated profile] planet_debian_feed

Posted by Dirk Eddelbuettel

A new version of the RcppCNPy package arrived on CRAN yesterday.

RcppCNPy provides R with read and write access to NumPy files thanks to the cnpy library by Carl Rogers.

This version updates internals for function registration, but otherwise mostly switches the vignette over to the shiny new pinp two-page template and package.

Changes in version 0.2.7 (2017-09-22)

  • Vignette updated to Rmd and use of pinp package

  • File src/init.c added for dynamic registration

CRANberries also provides a diffstat report for the latest release. As always, feedback is welcome and the best place to start a discussion may be the GitHub issue tickets page.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

RcppClassic 0.9.8

Sep. 23rd, 2017 07:06 pm
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Posted by Dirk Eddelbuettel

A bug-fix release RcppClassic 0.9.8 for the very recent 0.9.7 release which fixes a build issue on macOS introduced in 0.9.7. No other changes.

Courtesy of CRANberries, there are changes relative to the previous release.

Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Just in case you missed it

Sep. 23rd, 2017 11:30 am
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Posted by digby

Just in case you missed it

by digby





























Your president, ladies and gentlemen in all his glory. A real piece of work:




The NFL was not amused
President Donald Trump came under harsh criticism Saturday from the NFL and some of the NBA's top players after he blasted prominent athletes for kneeling during the national anthem, putting himself in the center of a controversy with significant racial and cultural undertones.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell slammed Trump in a statement Saturday morning, calling the President "divisive" for remarks he made at a rally in Alabama Friday night, while one of the most famous athletes in the world, LeBron James, called Trump a "bum" for a Saturday morning tweet aimed at the Golden State Warriors' Stephen Curry.

Trump's tweets and harsh reaction highlight an extraordinary moment -- the President, NFL commissioner and a top basketball player embroiled in a public fight over unity and patriotism.

Goodell said Trump's criticism of NFL players kneeling in protest during the National Anthem show a "lack of respect" for the league and its players.

"The NFL and our players are at our best when we help create a sense of unity in our country and our culture," Goodell said in the statement.

"There is no better example than the amazing response from our clubs and players to the terrible natural disasters we've experienced over the last month. Divisive comments like these demonstrate an unfortunate lack of respect for the NFL, our great game and all of our players, and a failure to understand the overwhelming force for good our clubs and players represent in our communities."

At a rally for Alabama Republican Sen. Luther Strange, Trump said team owners should fire players for taking a knee during the national anthem. He added that if fans would "leave the stadium" when players kneel in protest during the national anthem, "I guarantee, things will stop."

The WH says it also rescinded its invitation to the Warriors:

NBA star Stephen Curry was dis-invited from the White House on Saturday by President Trump.

“Going to the White House is considered a great honor for a championship team.Stephen Curry is hesitating,therefore invitation is withdrawn!” the chief executive tweeted at 8:45 a.m.
King James had something to say about that.



I would love to see the entire NFL, white and black, take the knee tomorrow. Go ahead, fire all of those alleged cowards who are ruining the game because they're wimps who won't take a hit like they did in the good old days.

I never knew  so many people actually thought the mean, drunk old man at the end of the bar made any sense.  Millions do, apparently.

.



Liberal Tears

Sep. 23rd, 2017 06:00 pm
[syndicated profile] atrios_feed
I get Trumpism but also I don't. He pisses off the libturds and that's enough for the 27 percenters. I get that part. But he's...repulsive and clearly incompetent and, well, you wouldn't want to have a beer with him even if he did drink. He's that guy at the party that no one wants to talk to.
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